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  • Brett Zalaski

Selling Offensively


In 2006, I played my 3rd season of baseball in the DCMSBL. It was also my last season before I moved away. After two really good years of playing prior, I was absolutely atrocious that 3rd season. My batting average dropped and I was just not good in the field. Figuring that baseball was getting past me, I've been all softball for the last 15 years.


Until this year. At my kids youth football game a couple months ago, I saw some older people playing baseball. I inquired as to what it was, found out, and signed up. I'm 3 games in after 15 years off, and I'm so proud with how I'm competing and playing.


What's the big difference? My attitude. In 2006 I had expectations that I would be really good and when I wasn't, or when I struggled a bit, I panicked and it impacted my entire game.


In 2021? I'm allowing myself to have zero expectations. I'm a kid on Christmas morning every single time on the field. I appreciate each at-bat and each ball hit my way. I appreciate being around my teammates and getting one more shot to play a game that I love.


In sports we become so myopic about what we need to do as our job (selling tickets), and we forget what got us really excited to take this job (working in pro sports) in the first place.


When we focus on selling tickets we product dump and become super salesy. When we focus on the experience we provide we tend to have dynamic conversations and are more creative in our approach.


Selling defensively is the concept that we need to move product each day. Selling offensively is providing our customers a wonderfully customized option that will maximize their most important relationships.


It's easy to poo-poo attitude in sales and focus on technique. And technique is critical. Ask anyone who's seen any of my trainings. But attitude is EVERYTHING in sales. The more positive we are the more we rely on the trained technique which allows us to engage better. The more we focus on results, the less we rely on the process, the more pressure we put on the conversation to have to go perfectly.


I wasted a year of baseball (and then 15 more!) because I was so focused on results I missed enjoying the process. Working in sports is an opportunity and a blessing. Find a way to remember that every, single day.