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  • Brett Zalaski

Should I be Judged on My Sales Activity?


One of the most viewed articles on the site focused on why people need to make phone calls to be successful. Last month a sales manager was reading that article as they discovered the website and wrote in with this question:


...Phone calls do matter to close business. I agree. But should I be tracking and setting activity standards around those?...


That is a good question. And I'm sure one that #sportsbiz sales reps, not just managers, grapple with all the time, too. What's the answer?


This may not be the answer you're looking for: Yes and No. But bear with me.


Sales activity will never be the disease that kills you as a sales rep, nor will it be the reason you are completely successful. It is, however, a symptom of your success or failure, though. Sales activity can level a playing field for a worse rep against a better rep, but, again, it's a symptom...not a solution. What does 'a symptom' mean exactly?


Success in sales is a combination of a lot of factors. How hard you work (ALL of phone calls, emails, meetings, social, etc.). How hard you work at making yourself better. How lucky you get. What type of connections you make. How you network. How dedicated you stay to pipeline management and pipeline movement. Most importantly, how consistent you are at all of these.


Consistency is king. Consistency is always the cure. Making 100 calls in one day is great. But if you make 25 each of the next four days, you made 200 calls that week. If you make 50 calls a day, you made 250 calls that week.


If you make 100 LinkedIn connections today, but zero the rest of the week, you made 100 LinkedIn connections. If you made 25 per day, you made 125 that week.


If you move 15 people through your pipeline today...that's awesome. Only do 5 more the rest of the week? You did 20. Move 5 people through your pipeline a day? You did 25 that week.


Do a sales training and make yourself 2% better? Good...but not as good as dedicating yourself to get 1% better every day...regardless of a structured sales training or not.


It's not about one of these things. It's the collection of all of them...and the consistency of all of them. And it's not about SETTING standards...it's about keeping standards.